How To Find An Apartment In Arlington With The Help Of A Real Estate Agent

Are you thinking of renting an apartment in Arlington?

Well, whether you want to rent alone or with a roommate, it’s best to get in touch with your local real estate agent ASAP. Real estate agents make it their business to know what’s going on in the housing markets they work in. Most people think that they would only need a real estate agent when they are selling or buying a home. But, renting a home also requires a market knowledge that only a real estate agent can provide.

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To buy, sell, rent, own, or manage Real Estate in Clarendon, contact Nesbitt Realty

 

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Understanding Agency Relationships

It’s important to understand what legal responsibilities your real estate salesperson has to you and to other parties in the transaction. Ask what type of agency relationship your agent has with you:

Seller’s representative (also known as a listing agent or seller’s agent)
A seller’s agent is hired by and represents the seller. All fiduciary duties are owed to the seller. The agency relationship usually is created by a listing contract.

Buyer’s representative (also known as a buyer’s agent)
A buyer’s agent is hired by prospective buyers to represent them in a real estate transaction. The buyer’s rep works in the buyer’s best interest throughout the transaction and owes fiduciary duties to the buyer. The buyer can pay the licensee directly through a negotiated fee, or the buyer’s rep may be paid by the seller or through a commission split with the seller’s agent.

Subagent
A subagent owes the same fiduciary duties to the agent’s customer as the agent does. Subagency usually arises when a cooperating sales associate from another brokerage, who is not the buyer’s agent, shows property to a buyer. In such a case, the subagent works with the buyer as a customer but owes fiduciary duties to the listing broker and the seller. Although a subagent cannot assist the buyer in any way that would be detrimental to the seller, a buyer-customer can expect to be treated honestly by the subagent. It is important that subagents fully explain their duties to buyers.

Disclosed dual agent
Dual agency is a relationship in which the brokerage firm represents both the buyer and the seller in the same real

estate transaction. Dual agency relationships do not carry with them all of the traditional fiduciary duties to clients. Instead, dual agents owe limited fiduciary duties. Because of the potential for conflicts of interest in a dual-agency relationship, it’s vital that all parties give their informed consent. In many states, this consent must be in writing. Disclosed dual agency, in which both the buyer and the seller are told that the agent is representing both of them, is legal in most states.

Designated agent (also called appointed agent)
This is a brokerage practice that allows the managing broker to designate which licensees in the brokerage will act as an agent of the seller and which will act as an agent of the buyer. Designated agency avoids the problem of creating a dual-agency relationship for licensees at the brokerage. The designated agents give their clients full representation, with all of the attendant fiduciary duties. The broker still has the responsibility of supervising both groups of licensees.

Nonagency relationship (called, among other things, a transaction broker or facilitator)
Some states permit a real estate licensee to have a type of nonagency relationship with a consumer. These relationships vary considerably from state to state, both as to the duties owed to the consumer and the name used to describe them. Very generally, the duties owed to the consumer in a nonagency relationship are less than the complete, traditional fiduciary duties of an agency relationship.

Featured Home For Sale in Alexandria VA

Properties in Alexandria

What is a real estate agent?

Julie Nesbitt
Julie Nesbitt

One of the most complex and significant financial events in peoples’ lives is the purchase or sale of real estate, be it a house, condo, townhouse or some other investment property. Because of this complexity and significance, people typically seek the help of real estate brokers and sales agents when buying or selling real estate.

Nesbitt Realty brokers and sales agents have a thorough knowledge of the real estate market in Northern Virginia communities. Our brokers and agents know which neighborhoods will best fit our clients’ needs and budgets. Nesbitt Realty real estate agents are familiar with local zoning and tax laws and know where to obtain financing. Agents and brokers also act as intermediaries in price negotiations between buyers and sellers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

  • Real estate brokers and sales agents often work evenings and weekends and usually are on call to suit the needs of clients.
  • A license to practice real estate is required in every State and the District of Columbia.
  • Although gaining a job may be relatively easy, beginning workers face competition from well-established, more experienced agents and brokers.
  • Employment is sensitive to swings in the economy, especially interest rates; during periods of declining economic activity and rising interest rates, the volume of sales and the resulting demand for sales workers fall.

You don’t need to know everything about buying and selling real estate if you hire a real estate professional who understand real estate. Paraphrasing Henry Ford, when you hire people who are smarter than you are, it proves you are smarter than they are. A real estate broker or agent acts as an intermediary between sellers and buyers of real estate (or real property as it is known elsewhere) and attempts to find sellers who wish to sell and buyers who wish to buy real estate.

When buying real estate, you may have several choices as to how you want a real estate firm and its agents to work with you. For example, you may want them to represent only you (as a buyer’s agent). You may be willing for them to represent both you and the seller at the same time (as a dual agent). Or you may agree to let them represent only the seller (seller’s agent or subagent). Some agents will offer you a choice of these services. Others may not. Realtor Logo

If you are selling real estate, you may want to “list” your property for sale with a real estate firm. If so, you will sign a “listing agreement” authorizing the firm and its agents to represent you in your dealings with buyers as your seller’s agent. You may also be asked to allow agents from other firms to help find a buyer for your property.

For more information or to set up an appointment call Julie at (703)765-0300.

What is a realtor?

According to the National Association of Realtors:

A real estate agent is a REALTOR® when he or she is a member of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, The Voice
for Real Estate® — the world’s largest professional association.

The term REALTOR® is a registered collective membership mark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of
the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics.

Founded in 1908, NAR has grown from its original nucleus of 120 to today’s 720,000 members. NAR is composed of residential
and commercial REALTORS®, who are brokers, salespeople, property managers, appraisers, counselors and others engaged in all aspects of the real estate industry. Members belong to one or more of some 1,700 local associations/boards and 54 state and
territory associations of REALTORS®. They can join one of our many institutes, societies and councils. Additionally, NAR offers members the opportunity to be active in our appraisal and international real estate specialty sections.

REALTORS® are pledged to a strict Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice. Working for America’s property owners, the National Association provides a facility for professional development, research and exchange of information among its members and to the public and government for the purpose of preserving the free enterprise system and the right to own real property.

Our agents are abides by this Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice. We strive to give our clients value by staying current and knowledgeable about the sales and purchase process. We also constantly increase and improve our knowledge of Northern Virginia’s communities, amenities and condominiums.

For more information or to set up an appointment call Julie at (703)765-0300.
  • Julie Nesbitt

    Julie Nesbitt
    Julie Nesbitt knows the back trails and by-ways of Northern Virginia real estate.

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  • Enjoying Winkler Botanical Preserve

    We had a great time walking the trails. 

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  • Don’t take chances with real estate.

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    Open House, Sunday, 1-4 BIG PRICE DROP! 7202 CHURCHILL ROAD McLean, VA 22101 6 Bedrooms 5.5 Bathrooms 6,752 SF $1,695,000

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    We played a game at the office this Sunday. Lots of fun. Sincerely, Will Nesbitt Principal Broker   Nesbitt RealtyAlexandria VA licensed in the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of Maryland 703 765 0300 (main) 571 237 7902 (direct)888 783 6391 (fax) ——– Original Message ——– Subject: The Empire Strikes Back Pictures From: [email protected]

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How does a real estate agent become a REALTOR?

RealtorA real estate agent is a professional licensed to buy, sell and manage real estate for a fee on the behalf of others. Not all real estate agents are REALTORS.  A broker is a real estate agent who has reached a higher educational standard and who accepts certain additional responsibilities commensurate with this level of licensing. The term “Realtor” is a registered collective membership mark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of the National Association of Realtors.

A real estate agent or broker who joins the National Association of Realtors is a Realtor.  The National Association of Realtors (NAR) claims to be world’s largest professional association. The single biggest distinction between a real estate agent and a Realtor is that all Realtors agree to abide by a strict Code of Ethics. From their voluntary adherence to a Code of Ethics to their incomparable knowledge of real estate processes, Realtors are the experts of residential and commercial property transactions.

Stuart and Will
A broker has a higher experience level and higher educational requirement than an agent, but both are Realtors.

Founded in 1908, National Association of Realtors has grown from its original nucleus of 120 members to more than 1 million today. National Association of Realtors is composed of Realtors who are involved in residential and commercial real estate as brokers, salespeople, property managers, appraisers, counselors, and others who are engaged in all aspects of the real estate industry.

Realtors belong to one or more of 1,700 local associations/boards and 54 state and territory associations of Realtors and can join one of our many institutes, societies, and councils. Brokers and agents of Condo Alexandria are members of the Northern Virginia Association of Realtors. Additionally, National Association of Realtors offers members the opportunity to be active in our appraisal and international real estate specialty sections. Realtors are pledged to a strict Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice.

Working for America’s property owners, the National Association of Realtors provides a facility for professional development, research, and exchange of information among its members. Condo Alexandria agents and brokers take advantage of educational opportunities with the National Association of Realtors and the Northern Virginia Association of Realtors to continue expanding our knowledge of all aspects of real estate related expertise.

For more information or to set up an appointment call Stuart at (703)765-0300.

What do real estate agents do?

When selling property, brokers and agents arrange for title searches to verify ownership and for meetings between buyers and sellers during which they agree to the details of the transactions and in a final meeting, the new owners take possession of the property. They also may help to arrange favorable financing from a lender for the prospective buyer; often, this makes the difference between success and failure in closing a sale. In some cases, brokers and agents assume primary responsibility for closing sales; in others, lawyers or lenders do.

Duties to Sellers

Agents and brokers spend a significant amount of time looking for properties to sell. They obtain listings—agreements by owners to place properties for sale with the firm. When listing a property for sale, agents and brokers compare the listed property with similar properties that recently sold, in order to determine a competitive market price for the property. Following the sale of the property, both the agent who sold it and the agent who obtained the listing receive a portion of the commission. Thus, agents who sell a property that they themselves have listed can increase their commission.

The listing firm and its agents must

  • promote the sellers’ best interests
  • be loyal to the seller
  • follow the sellers’ lawful instructions
  • provide the seller with all material facts that could influence your decisions
  • use reasonable skill, care and diligence, and
  • account for all monies they handle for the seller.

Once you have signed the listing agreement, the firm and its agents may not give any confidential information about you to prospective buyers or their agents without your permission so long as they represent you.

Duties to Buyers

If the real estate firm and its agents represent you, they must

  • promote the buyers’ best interests
  • be loyal to the buyer
  • follow the buyers’ lawful instructions
  • provide the buyer with all material facts that could influence your decisions
  • use reasonable skill, care and diligence, and
  • account for all monies handled for the buyer.

Before showing residential properties to potential buyers, agents meet with them to get an idea of the type of home the buyers would like. In this prequalifying phase, the agent determines how much the buyers can afford to spend. In addition, the agent and the buyer usually sign a loyalty contract, which states that the agent will be the only one to show houses to the buyer. An agent or broker then generates lists of properties for sale, their location and description, and available sources of financing. In some cases, agents and brokers use computers to give buyers a virtual tour of properties that interest them.

Agents may meet several times with prospective buyers to discuss and visit available properties. Agents identify and emphasize the most pertinent selling points. To a young family looking for a house, for example, they may emphasize the convenient floor plan, the area’s low crime rate, and the proximity to schools and shopping. To a potential investor, they may point out the tax advantages of owning a rental property and the ease of finding a renter. If bargaining over price becomes necessary, agents must follow their client’s instructions carefully and may have to present counteroffers to get the best possible price.

Once the buyer and seller have signed a contract, the real estate broker or agent must make sure that all special terms of the contract are met before the closing date. The agent must make sure that any legally mandated or agreed-upon inspections, such as termite and radon inspections, take place. In addition, if the seller agrees to any repairs, the broker or agent ensures they are made. Increasingly, brokers and agents are handling environmental problems as well, by making sure that the properties they sell meet environmental regulations. For example, they may be responsible for dealing with lead paint on the walls. Loan officers, attorneys, or other people handle many details, but the agent must ensure that they are carried out.

Most real estate brokers and sales agents sell residential property. A small number—usually employed in large or specialized firms—sell commercial, industrial, agricultural, or other types of real estate. Every specialty requires knowledge of that particular type of property and clientele. Selling or leasing business property requires an understanding of leasing practices, business trends, and the location of the property. Agents who sell or lease industrial properties must know about the region’s transportation, utilities, and labor supply. Whatever the type of property, the agent or broker must know how to meet the client’s particular requirements.

Brokers and agents do the same type of work, but brokers are licensed to manage their own real estate businesses. Agents must work with a broker. They usually provide their services to a licensed real estate broker on a contract basis. In return, the broker pays the agent a portion of the commission earned from the agent’s sale of the property. Brokers, as independent businesspeople, often sell real estate owned by others; they also may rent or manage properties for a fee.

Play It Straight With Marketing Services Fees

Real estate brokers marketing the use of a preferred lender, title company, or other settlement service provider should take care to avoid RESPA violations that can be incurred when marketing fees exceed the reasonable value of the services performed.

These services include signs inside or outside the sales office and homes up for sale; e-mail or direct mail campaigns; banner ads and preferred partner links on the broker’s and agents’ Web sites; and the use of the broker’s name and logo in preferred partner marketing materials.

Brokers should request that the preferred partner use an independent marketing expert or system to value the marketing fee and ensure that service and activity levels are reviewed regularly.

Source: RISMedia, Mark L. Meyer (10/18/2010)

Expanding Federal Government Needs Space

The federal government is driving demand for office space, according to Jones Lang LaSalle’s annual report on federal real estate procurement.

US Capitol dome
US Capitol Dome

In Washington, D.C., the federal government will require more than 5 million square feet of new office space by the end of 2010. That is more than both public and private entities combined will require elsewhere in the United States.

“I’d say it would make sense for brokers to be targeting federal agencies rather than private agencies,” says Scott Homa, senior market research analyst at Jones Lang LaSalle.

Source: GlobeSt.com, Robert Carr (03/31/2010)

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